Bright Wishes: 1 NEW Stamp Set, 2 Different Watercolor Techniques

We’re only TEN days away from the launch of the 2017-2018 catalog where you will see some gorgeous new products like the wishing well set called Bright Wishes which I am sharing a sneak peek of today.

Bright Wishes contains a beautiful large line-drawn well stamp which lends itself well to all types of coloring techniques.  For those who know me, they know I LOVE to color stamped images!

While my preference for coloring is using a great set of colored pencils (Yes, you can imagine my excitement when SU! brought back watercolor pencils!), the images from the Bright Wishes set above are both stamped onto watercolor paper and colored with markers and an Aqua Painter for a watercolor look.

One of the images took THREE TIMES longer than the other to color.  Can you guess which one?    Read on for the answer.

The card on the left was created by first stamping the Bright Wishes well in Sahara Sand.  This light color was chosen because it would essentially disappear and allow the image to take on a more free-handed watercolor appearance once the marker/aqua painter watercolor was added. Because it is necessary to color up to the lines and extra care added to adjusting/overlaying colors, there is a lot of moving to dry areas and waiting for the adjacent area to dry so that you can add more color. In other words- If you don’t wait for the well stones to dry and watercolor the greenery you’d have green bleed into the well’s stones.  It isn’t easy to remove watercolor bleed!  You must have dry surfaces when you watercolor in adjacent areas or add color over areas.  This is why the PINK card on the left took 3x longer than the BLUE one on the right.

The BLUE card on the right was inked by applying marker ink to each area using different colors. I colored the roses Real Red, the greenery Old Olive, the well stones Crumb Cake, the wood Sahara Sand, etc.  Once the whole stamp had ink, I huffed on it (adding moisture from my breath back to any area which may have dried) and stamped the image.  I then used an Aqua Painter where the brush was just damp enough to move the color around within the leaves, flowers, stones, wood, etc.  This creates a watercolor look, however it also takes all definition of the stamp away.  Once the image dries, ink the stamp with Chocolate Chip and using a Stamp positioner like the Stamp-A-Ma-Jig, stamp the details over the image. Your watercolor blobs of color will have definition once again.

Did you know which one took longer?

Do you have a preference in the results?  Just because a technique takes longer doesn’t mean everyone would prefer the results over the less time consuming result.

However you decide to color the Bright Wishes stamp set, I believe if you like to color it is a great set to add to your collection. You can do that starting June 1, 2017 by shopping with me HERE.

Until next time…

-Joanne

How to watercolor with Stampin’ UP! markers

Watercolor.  You hear the word and you think, “I’m not sure I can do that”.  You see beautifully watercolor images on the internet and have convinced yourself you can not possibly recreate something like those samples.  I’m here to tell you that you can, BUT you must start trying!

Vincent Van Gogh believed this to be true as an artist; experimenting with art is the only way to learn how to do it.

I’m sitting down with my Stampin’ UP! downline this week for an introduction to watercolor.  While I am certainly no expert myself (far from it!), I offered to help her learn some basics.  We’ll be playing around with markers to make this:

It isn’t a completed card or project, just the stamp & watercolor image.  An image you can soon buy yourself, June 1, in the new 2017-2018 Stampin’ UP! Catalog.

Since I’m not hosting all of you for this in person one-on-one, I thought I’d give all of you the same instructions I’m giving her.

How to watercolor an image with Stampin’ UP! markers:

  • Start with an image which has been stamped onto watercolor cardstock.  Use Stazon Jet Black (retiring), Archival grey or black Inks (thoroughly dried) or inking and then clear embossing  images is best so the color does not run. * Note: It is necessary to stamp over the image multiple times to create a nice clean image (watercolor paper has a bumpy surface and it takes a bit more to get a cleanly stamped image.)  A stamp positioner is your best friend in this scenario.  Stampin’ UP! sells a Stamp-A-Ma-Jig.
  • Using a water-based markers, such as those Stampin’ UP! makes, draw around the inner edge of the outlined stamped image.
  • Press the sides of an Aqua Painter filled with water until it releases water, then wipe in a paper towel so it is not overly wet (I hold the paper towel in my opposite hand than the aqua painter through the whole process)
  • Once Aqua Painter is primed, brush over the area you markered, pulling color into the inside of the image, blending out your marker lines.
  • Wipe off color and drip Aqua Painter until clear when switching colors.
  • Do only one color at a time. Repeat until stamped image is colored in.
  • To add table: draw lines from side of pot and scribble a bit under pot.  Use Aqua Painter to blend out lines.

It really is that simple as following the steps above to watercolor in the pot. Stamping a few to play with is always suggested.  Remember, you may have to keep “doing” as Vincent Van Gogh said,  to get it the way you want.

In the sample above, the splatters & splotches are added when the image is done.  Scribble your marker on an acrylic block and use Aqua Painter to pick up color and the pen cap, with brush partially inserted to ‘flick’ color to paper. Be careful you or your surroundings don’t get inky.  Add puddles by dripping color straight from the Aqua Painter (takes a while to dry).

Be not afraid and buy that watercolor paper from Stampin’ UP! Get those watercolor pencils.  Get those markers.  Get the Aqua painters. Get a spritzer.  And give it a shot.

I wish I could do as this stamped image says, “Crafting Forever, Housework Never”, but my craft room is a mess and I’m having company.  So, I should do some housework…unless I just tell my downline I was too busy crafting…hmm…

Until next time…

-Joanne

New lighthouse stamp set High Tide

Have you seen the New lighthouse stamp set called High Tide in the Occasions catalog?

It’s a photopolymer stamp set and in the US it costs $26.00.

I really like the sentiments in this set.  Plus, all the bits will build some nice scenes (sun/moon, water, grass, sand, etc.)

Today, I’m sharing an obvious use of the High Tide stamp set- building a scene of a lighthouse by the sea.

 I would recommend to anyone using this set to also use the Stamp-a-ma-jig Stampin’ Up! sells (or another stamp positioner which you prefer). It will make lining up the two light house pieces and the sand area at the lighthouse base so much easier than eye-balling it and hoping for the best.   In my sample, I used a stamp positioner for those 3 pieces and a regular acrylic block for the other stamps. I had no issues with stamp placement doing this.

Thanks for stopping by today.

Until next time…

-Joanne

 

The First Valentines of 2017

The Lift Me Up Bundle which I discussed and shared this past Friday was the inspiration for getting me motivated to start making Valentines early.

These are the first Valentines I created for 2017:

The first of these cards is made with the heart die which is included in the Up & Away Thinlits Dies, these dies are part of the Lift Me Up Bundle if you choose to add the matching stamps. (see Occasions catalog p.10).

By simply die cutting the heart multiple times and in various colors (I chose: flirty flamingo, smoky slate, melon mambo, and cherry cobbler), using your Stampin’ Up! trimmer’s scoring blade to create embossed lines, stamping a sentiment (this one is from Teeny Tiny Wishes), and adding a bit of twine & some rhinestones, you have a finished Valentine.

Want to give a try at the new watercolor pencils on p.24 of the Occasions catalog?  The card below is a simple beginner watercolor technique.

On a piece of Whisper White card stock (3.75″x5″) scribble the Rich Razzleberry, Real Red, Calypso Coral, Melon Mambo colored pencils to the center of each side (in that order) along the 3.75″ side-overlap colors as you go for blending.  Yes, just scribble a small area of each color, like a pink rainbow meeting in the center as the lightest point.

Go back over your pencil scribbles with an Aqua painter (Mine are always filled with distilled water), whose bristles are wet but not dripping and blend out pencil marks and blend the colors together.  Do not go completely to the edge so some white areas show.

Too much water and Whisper White will pill and the water will seep thru the paper.  Slight buckling of Whisper White card stock will occur and a stronger adhesive (tear tape) is perfect for adhering it to your card mat or  base to make it flat.  If you are having excessive buckling or any paper pilling/seepage try the Shimmery White card stock or the specialty Water color paper Stampin’ Up! carries. With a light hand, however, you can make it work. Sometimes it takes a bit to figure out how much water to use on each type of card stock and your environment (humidity levels)may effect results.

Add die cuts in Flirtly Flamingo & Melon Mambo from the Swirly Scribbles dies and a few rhinestones, a Flirtly Flamingo mat (4″x5.25″) & a Blushing Bride card base (4.25″x5.5″)  and you are finished with this super simple watercolor Valentine’s card.

Now is a great time to shop Stampin’ Up!  Every $50.00 (USD) spent before shipping/tax can earn you free products from the Sale-A-Bration catalog.  Click Here to see the catalogs and shop online.  Contact me if you have any questions about free items from this special sales period (January 4-March 31, 2017).

Until next time…

-Joanne